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Posts Tagged ‘wasp control’

Wasp and Bee Control MN

People who are not familiar with bees often have a fear of them. Swarming bees are generally not inclined to sting provided they are left alone – but the following precautions should be taken.  Getting rid of these pests can sometimes be fearful, especially if you are allergic. A large nest may mean an attack and stings on you or other people in the area. Hiring a Professional Pest Control Expert can mean safe and efficient handling of the wasps and bees. (more…)

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Characteristics Of Bees

Bees are reliant on pollen as a protein source and on flowers nectar or oils as an energy source. Adult females collect pollen primarily to feed their larvae. The pollen they inevitably lose in going from flower to flowers is important to plants because some pollen lands on the pistils (productive structure) of other flowers of the same species, resulting in cross pollination. Bee’s are the most significant pollinating insects, and their interdependence with plants makes them an excellent example of the type of symbiosis known as mutualism, an association between unlike organisms that is beneficial to both parties. (more…)

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Pest Control Experts Minnesota

Wasps and bees sting to defend themselves or their colony. Stinging involves the injection of protein venom that causes pain and other reactions.

Wasps and bumblebees can sting more than once because they are able to pull out their stinger without injury to themselves. If a wasp or bumblebee stings you, the stinger is not left in your skin.

Wasps and Bees

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Bee Pest Control  in Minnesota

Wasps and bees are beneficial insects, although they are generally considered to be pests because of their ability to sting. Wasps, in particular, can become a problem in autumn when they may disrupt many outdoor activities. People often mistakenly call all stinging insects “bees”. While both social wasps and bees live in colonies ruled by queens and maintained by workers, they look and behave differently. It is important to distinguish between these insects because different methods may be necessary to control them if they become a nuisance. (more…)

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What is the Difference Between Bees and Wasps?

Wasps and bees are beneficial insects, although they are generally considered to be pests because of their ability to sting. Wasps, in particular, can become a problem in autumn when they may disrupt many outdoor activities. People often mistakenly call all stinging insects “bees”. While both social wasps and bees live in colonies ruled by queens and maintained by workers, they look and behave differently. It is important to distinguish between these insects because different methods may be necessary to control them if they become a nuisance.

Bees and wasps all belong to the order Hymenoptera. They are also members of the suborder Apocrita, characterized by a common narrow waist. This waist is really a thin junction between the thorax and the abdomen, giving these insects a waist-like appearance. (more…)

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Minnesota Bees and Wasps Control

Because of their environmental value, many pest companies recommend controlling bee populations rather than exterminating them.  You can prevent a wood-burrowing species from damaging your home or establishing a colony in a dangerous area by applying bee repellents.  Other repellents can be sprayed near areas where bees already exist, but you should be cautious.  Not only is this method dangerous for one who is unprotected, it is dangerous for others.  The bees may simply swarm to a neighbor’s home, rather than to a safer place. (more…)

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Wasps can be differentiated from bees as bees have a flattened hind basitarsus. Unlike bees, wasps generally lack plumose hairs. They vary in the number and size of hairs they have between species.

First stage

After emerging from hibernation during early spring, the young queens search for a suitable nesting site. Upon finding an area for their future colony, the queen constructs a basic paper fibre nest roughly the size of a walnut into which she will begin to lay eggs.

Second stage

The sperm that were stored earlier and kept dormant over winter is now used to fertilize the eggs being laid. The storage of sperm inside the female queen allows her to lay a considerable number of fertilized eggs without the need for repeated mating with a male wasp. For this reason a single female queen is capable of building an entire colony from only herself. The queen initially raises the first several sets of wasp eggs until enough sterile female workers exist to maintain the offspring without her assistance. All of the eggs produced at this time are sterile female workers who will begin to construct a more elaborate nest around their queen as they grow in number.

Third stage

By this time the nest size has expanded considerably and now numbers between several hundred and several thousand wasps. Towards the end of the summer, the queen begins to run out of stored sperm to fertilize more eggs. These eggs develop into fertile males and fertile female queens. The male drones then fly out of the nest and find a mate thus perpetuating the wasp reproductive cycle. In most species of social wasp the young queens mate in the vicinity of their home nest and do not travel like their male counterparts do. The young queens will then leave the colony to hibernate for the winter once the other worker wasps and founder queen have started to die off. After successfully mating with a young queen, the male drones die off as well. Generally, young queens and drones from the same nest do not mate with each other; this ensures more genetic variation within wasp populations, especially considering that all members of the colony are theoretically the direct genetic descendants of the founder queen and a single male drone. In practice, however, colonies can sometimes consist of the offspring of several male drones. Wasp queens generally (but not always) create new nests each year, this is probably because the weak construction of most nests render them uninhabitable after the winter.

Unlike most honey bee queens, wasp queens typically only live for one year (although exceptions are possible). Also, contrary to popular belief queen wasps do not organize their colony or have any raised status and hierarchical power within the social structure. They are more simply the reproductive element of the colony and the initial builder of the nest in those species which construct nests.

Getting rid of these pests can sometimes be fearful, especially if you are allergic.  A large nest may mean an attack and stings on you or other people in the area.  Hiring a professional pest control can mean safe and efficient handling of the wasps and bees.  Pest control experts are trained in handling these stinging pests and we can rid your home or business quickly using nontoxic organic products.

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